I was asked to show photos of  where I think is a perfect place to live during my short stay in Buenos Aires.

Casa de Troilo Plaque

Casa de Natal Troilo Plaque

The house is called “casa natal” which means birthplace, as this home was the birthplace of “El bandoneon mayor de buenos aires” or the “greatest bandoneon in Buenos Aires”, Anibal Pichuco Troilo, better known as “Gordo Pichuco”.

The bandoneon is an instrument used in tango ensembles that looks and sounds like a concertina, or a small accordion.  Since Argentina is the birthplace of Tango music, it is only natural that they would honor a man like Gordo with a plaque outside his birthplace.

Front Hallway Entrance

Front Hallway Entrance

As you can see, there are some really cute nooks and crannies etched into the walls, which hold a variety of antique objects not shown in these photos.

View walking through the front entrance

View walking through the front entrance

The space is now rented by Rocio and Pablo, who moved in 5 years ago with their two little ones. At the time, the house was not really even a house, it was more like historic ruins with a series of  walls and arches and a lot of open air space. Two years later they moved themselves into one part of the space they now call home, and Pablo transformed the main areas of the house into much more livable house, while keeping the esence of the original space intact.  Part of the construction involved the creation of 6 rentable rooms that sleep up to 9 people.

As you walk through the front entrance, you approach the open-air patio. Patios are a staple in the Buenos Aires homes that I’ve seen, as they almost always house the family Parilla, or BBQ.

Parilla (Pah-ree-jah) at dusk

Parilla (Pah-ree-jah) at dusk

My room is located just across from the Parilla, separated off from the main casa.

View from my room

View of the patio from my room

Essentials: Colchon, Desk, Space Heater

Essentials: Colchon, Desk, Space Heater

Do not underestimate the essential power of that little space heater! Did I mention it’s winter here in Buenos Aires? Despite the chilly temps (lows in the low 30s) most homes and businesses in Argentina are not equipped with central heating so you quickly become accustomed to using these almighty heat creators.

Mi cama chica, more orange and pink motif

Mi cama chica, more orange and pink motif

The room is basic and cheap, but the best part of the deal is the house itself, and the people within it.  Entering the casa from the patio is one big open space with living and dining areas and a nice kitchen with a comfy alcove where we often set-up our computers or chat.

Bianca and Camilla hanging out at the house

Bianca and Camilla hanging out at the house

Kitchen and eating alcove

Kitchen and eating alcove

While everyone in the house is out and about working, studying Spanish, cinema, or teaching English during the day, on Thursdays each week Pablo fires up the coals on the Parilla and cooks the best steak you can imagine and we all gather to eat this scrumptious family-style dinner at the house.

Pablo workin the Parilla

Pablo workin the Parilla

Carne cookin parilla style

Carne cookin parilla style
Close up on the chops

Close up on those chops

La casa

Familia y amigas de la casa natal

Y, Asi es la vida de la casa natal!

The end!

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